LA TRAVIATA

by Giuseppe Verdi

Friday, January 25, 2019 at 7:30 PM
Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 7:30 PM
Sunday, January 27, 2019 at 2:00 PM

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In the salon of Violetta’s Parisian apartment, any cause to celebrate inspires a lavish party. But when Violetta unexpectedly meets her first real love, Alfredo, will moral obligations of society and a life-threatening illness keep her from the promise of true love?

The first opera of the 2018-2019 season is Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata, the heartbreaking story of a Parisian courtesan’s impossible choice between love and moral obligation. Tenor Alexey Tatarintsev will return to Palm Beach Opera as Alfredo Germont. He recently appeared in the company’s production of Rigoletto. Appearing on the Palm Beach Opera stage for the first time, Baritone Massimo Cavalletti, who recently debuted with the Paris Opera, will play Giorgio Germont.

The cast and orchestra will be led by Verdi specialist Maestro Antonello Allemandi, who previously conducted the company’s internationally acclaimed production of Rigoletto.

Sung in Italian with English supertitles projected above the stage.

  • Antonello Allemandi
    Antonello Allemandi
    Conductor
  • Kristina Mkhitaryan*
    Kristina Mkhitaryan*
    Violetta
  • Jacqueline Echols
    Jacqueline Echols
    Violetta (1/26)
  • Alexey Tatarintsev
    Alexey Tatarintsev
    Alfredo Germont
  • Derrek Stark+
    Derrek Stark+
    Alfredo Germont (1/26)
  • Massimo Cavalletti*
    Massimo Cavalletti*
    Giorgio Germont

*Palm Beach Opera Debut
^Benenson Young Artist
+Former Young Artist

Additional cast information will be listed as it becomes available.
Cast subject to change.

ACT I

The salon in Violetta’s house

Scene 1: Party

Violetta Valéry, a famed courtesan, throws a lavish party at her Paris salon to celebrate her recovery from an illness. Gastone, a viscount, has brought with him a friend, Alfredo Germont, a young bourgeois from a provincial family who has long adored Violetta from afar. While walking to the salon, Gastone tells Violetta that Alfredo loves her, and that while she was ill, he came to her house every day. Alfredo joins them, admitting the truth of Gastone’s remarks.

Baron Douphol, Violetta’s current lover, waits nearby to escort her to the salon; once there, the Baron is asked to give a toast, but refuses, and the crowd turns to Alfredo, who agrees to sing a brindisi – a drinking song (Alfredo, Violetta, chorus: Libiamo ne’ lieti calici – “Drink from the joyful cup”).

From the next room, the sound of the orchestra is heard and the guests move there to dance. After a series of severe coughs and almost fainting, Violetta begins to feel dizzy and asks her guests to go ahead and to leave her to rest until she recovers. While the guests dance in the next room, Violetta looks at her pale face in her mirror. Alfredo enters and expresses his concern for her fragile health, later declaring his love for her (Alfredo, Violetta: Un dì, felice, eterea – “One day, happy and ethereal”). At first, she rejects him because his love means nothing to her, but there is something about Alfredo that touches her heart. He is about to leave when she gives him a flower, telling him to return it when it has wilted, which will be the very next day.

After the guests leave, Violetta wonders if Alfredo could actually be the one in her life (Violetta: È strano! … Ah, fors’è lui – “Ah, perhaps he is the one”). But she concludes that she needs freedom to live her life (Violetta, Alfredo: Sempre libera – “Always free”). From off stage, Alfredo’s voice is heard singing about love as he walks down the street.

ACT II

Scene 1: Violetta’s country house outside Paris

Three months later, Alfredo and Violetta are living together in a peaceful country house outside Paris. Violetta has fallen in love with Alfredo and she has completely abandoned her former life. Alfredo sings of their happy life together (Alfredo: De’ miei bollenti spiriti / Il giovanile ardore – “The youthful ardor of my ebullient spirits”). Annina, the maid, arrives from Paris, and, when questioned by Alfredo, tells him that she went there to sell the horses, carriages and everything owned by Violetta to support their country lifestyle.

Alfredo is shocked to learn this and leaves for Paris immediately to settle matters himself. Violetta returns home and receives an invitation from her friend, Flora, to a party in Paris that evening. Alfredo’s father, Giorgio Germont, is announced and demands that she break off her relationship with his son for the sake of his family, since he reveals that Violetta’s relationship with Alfredo has threatened his daughter’s engagement (Giorgio: Pura siccome un angelo, Iddio mi diè una figlia – “Pure as an angel, God gave me a daughter”) because of Violetta’s reputation. Meanwhile, he reluctantly becomes impressed by Violetta’s nobility, something which he did not expect from a courtesan. She responds that she cannot end the relationship because she loves him so much, but Giorgio pleads with her for the sake of his family. With growing remorse, she finally agrees (Violetta, Giorgio: Dite alla giovine, sì bella e pura, – “Tell the young girl, so beautiful and pure,”) and says goodbye to Giorgio. In a gesture of gratitude for her kindness and sacrifice, Giorgio kisses her forehead before leaving her weeping alone.

Violetta gives a note to Annina to send to Flora accepting the party invitation and, as she is writing a farewell letter to Alfredo, he enters. She can barely control her sadness and tears; she tells him repeatedly of her unconditional love (Violetta: Amami, Alfredo, amami quant’io t’amo – “Love me, Alfredo, love me as I love you”). Before rushing out and setting off for Paris, she hands the farewell letter to her servant to give to Alfredo.

Soon, the servant brings the letter to Alfredo and, as soon as he has read it, Giorgio returns and attempts to comfort his son, reminding him of his family in Provence (Giorgio: Di Provenza il mar, il suol chi dal cor ti cancellò? – “Who erased the sea, the land of Provence from your heart?”). Alfredo suspects that the Baron is behind his separation with Violetta, and the party invitation, which he finds on the desk, strengthens his suspicions. He decides to confront Violetta at the party. Giorgio tries to stop Alfredo, but he rushes out.

Scene 2: Party at Flora’s house

At the party, the Marquis tells Flora that Violetta and Alfredo have separated, much to the amazement of everyone who had previously seen the happy couple. She calls for the entertainers to perform for the guests (Chorus: Noi siamo zingarelle venute da lontano – “We are gypsy girls who have come from afar”; Di Madride noi siam mattadori – “We are matadors from Madrid”). Gastone and his friends join the matadors and sing (Gastone, chorus, dancers: È Piquillo un bel gagliardo Biscaglino mattador – “Piquillo is a bold and handsome matador from Biscay”).

Violetta arrives with Baron Douphol. They see Alfredo at the gambling table. When he sees them, Alfredo loudly proclaims that he will take Violetta home with him. Feeling annoyed, the Baron goes to the gambling table and joins him in a game. As they bet, Alfredo wins some large sums until Flora announces that supper is ready. Alfredo leaves with handfuls of money.

As everyone is leaving the room, Violetta has asked Alfredo to see her. Fearing that the Baron’s anger will lead him to challenge Alfredo to a duel, she gently asks Alfredo to leave. Alfredo misunderstands her apprehension and demands that she admit that she loves the Baron. In grief, she makes that admission and, furiously, Alfredo calls the guests to witness what he has to say (Questa donna conoscete? – “You know this woman?”). He humiliates and denounces Violetta in front of the guests and then throws his winnings at her feet in payment for her services. She faints onto the floor. The guests reprimand Alfredo: Di donne ignobile insultatore, di qua allontanati, ne desti orror! (“Ignoble insulter of women, go away from here, you fill us with horror!”).

In search of his son, Giorgio enters the hall and, knowing the real significance of the scene, denounces his son’s behavior (Giorgio, Alfredo, Violetta, chorus: Di sprezzo degno sè stesso rende chi pur nell’ira la donna offende. – “A man, who even in anger, offends a woman renders himself deserving of contempt.”).

Flora and the ladies attempt to persuade Violetta to leave the dining room, but Violetta turns to Alfredo: Alfredo, Alfredo, di questo core non puoi comprendere tutto l’amore… – “Alfredo, Alfredo, you can’t understand all the love in this heart…”.

ACT III

Violetta’s bedroom

Cover of a circa 1855 vocal score with an engraving by Leopoldo Ratti
Dr. Grenvil tells Annina that Violetta will not live long since her tuberculosis has worsened. Alone in her room, Violetta reads a letter from Alfredo’s father telling her that the Baron was only wounded in his duel with Alfredo; that he has informed Alfredo of the sacrifice she has made for him and his sister; and that he is sending his son to see her as quickly as possible to ask for her forgiveness. But Violetta senses it is too late (Violetta: Addio, del passato bei sogni ridenti – “Farewell, lovely, happy dreams of the past”).

Annina rushes in the room to tell Violetta of Alfredo’s arrival. The lovers are reunited and Alfredo suggests that they leave Paris (Alfredo, Violetta: Parigi, o cara, noi lasceremo – “We will leave Paris, O beloved”).

But it is too late: she knows her time is up (Alfredo, Violetta: Gran Dio!…morir sì giovane – “Great God!…to die so young”). Alfredo’s father enters with the doctor, regretting what he has done. After singing a duet with Alfredo, Violetta suddenly revives, exclaiming that the pain and discomfort have left her. A moment later, she dies in Alfredo’s arms.

CAST
  • Antonello Allemandi
    Antonello Allemandi
    Conductor
  • Kristina Mkhitaryan*
    Kristina Mkhitaryan*
    Violetta
  • Jacqueline Echols
    Jacqueline Echols
    Violetta (1/26)
  • Alexey Tatarintsev
    Alexey Tatarintsev
    Alfredo Germont
  • Derrek Stark+
    Derrek Stark+
    Alfredo Germont (1/26)
  • Massimo Cavalletti*
    Massimo Cavalletti*
    Giorgio Germont

*Palm Beach Opera Debut
^Benenson Young Artist
+Former Young Artist

Additional cast information will be listed as it becomes available.
Cast subject to change.

SYNOPSIS

ACT I

The salon in Violetta’s house

Scene 1: Party

Violetta Valéry, a famed courtesan, throws a lavish party at her Paris salon to celebrate her recovery from an illness. Gastone, a viscount, has brought with him a friend, Alfredo Germont, a young bourgeois from a provincial family who has long adored Violetta from afar. While walking to the salon, Gastone tells Violetta that Alfredo loves her, and that while she was ill, he came to her house every day. Alfredo joins them, admitting the truth of Gastone’s remarks.

Baron Douphol, Violetta’s current lover, waits nearby to escort her to the salon; once there, the Baron is asked to give a toast, but refuses, and the crowd turns to Alfredo, who agrees to sing a brindisi – a drinking song (Alfredo, Violetta, chorus: Libiamo ne’ lieti calici – “Drink from the joyful cup”).

From the next room, the sound of the orchestra is heard and the guests move there to dance. After a series of severe coughs and almost fainting, Violetta begins to feel dizzy and asks her guests to go ahead and to leave her to rest until she recovers. While the guests dance in the next room, Violetta looks at her pale face in her mirror. Alfredo enters and expresses his concern for her fragile health, later declaring his love for her (Alfredo, Violetta: Un dì, felice, eterea – “One day, happy and ethereal”). At first, she rejects him because his love means nothing to her, but there is something about Alfredo that touches her heart. He is about to leave when she gives him a flower, telling him to return it when it has wilted, which will be the very next day.

After the guests leave, Violetta wonders if Alfredo could actually be the one in her life (Violetta: È strano! … Ah, fors’è lui – “Ah, perhaps he is the one”). But she concludes that she needs freedom to live her life (Violetta, Alfredo: Sempre libera – “Always free”). From off stage, Alfredo’s voice is heard singing about love as he walks down the street.

ACT II

Scene 1: Violetta’s country house outside Paris

Three months later, Alfredo and Violetta are living together in a peaceful country house outside Paris. Violetta has fallen in love with Alfredo and she has completely abandoned her former life. Alfredo sings of their happy life together (Alfredo: De’ miei bollenti spiriti / Il giovanile ardore – “The youthful ardor of my ebullient spirits”). Annina, the maid, arrives from Paris, and, when questioned by Alfredo, tells him that she went there to sell the horses, carriages and everything owned by Violetta to support their country lifestyle.

Alfredo is shocked to learn this and leaves for Paris immediately to settle matters himself. Violetta returns home and receives an invitation from her friend, Flora, to a party in Paris that evening. Alfredo’s father, Giorgio Germont, is announced and demands that she break off her relationship with his son for the sake of his family, since he reveals that Violetta’s relationship with Alfredo has threatened his daughter’s engagement (Giorgio: Pura siccome un angelo, Iddio mi diè una figlia – “Pure as an angel, God gave me a daughter”) because of Violetta’s reputation. Meanwhile, he reluctantly becomes impressed by Violetta’s nobility, something which he did not expect from a courtesan. She responds that she cannot end the relationship because she loves him so much, but Giorgio pleads with her for the sake of his family. With growing remorse, she finally agrees (Violetta, Giorgio: Dite alla giovine, sì bella e pura, – “Tell the young girl, so beautiful and pure,”) and says goodbye to Giorgio. In a gesture of gratitude for her kindness and sacrifice, Giorgio kisses her forehead before leaving her weeping alone.

Violetta gives a note to Annina to send to Flora accepting the party invitation and, as she is writing a farewell letter to Alfredo, he enters. She can barely control her sadness and tears; she tells him repeatedly of her unconditional love (Violetta: Amami, Alfredo, amami quant’io t’amo – “Love me, Alfredo, love me as I love you”). Before rushing out and setting off for Paris, she hands the farewell letter to her servant to give to Alfredo.

Soon, the servant brings the letter to Alfredo and, as soon as he has read it, Giorgio returns and attempts to comfort his son, reminding him of his family in Provence (Giorgio: Di Provenza il mar, il suol chi dal cor ti cancellò? – “Who erased the sea, the land of Provence from your heart?”). Alfredo suspects that the Baron is behind his separation with Violetta, and the party invitation, which he finds on the desk, strengthens his suspicions. He decides to confront Violetta at the party. Giorgio tries to stop Alfredo, but he rushes out.

Scene 2: Party at Flora’s house

At the party, the Marquis tells Flora that Violetta and Alfredo have separated, much to the amazement of everyone who had previously seen the happy couple. She calls for the entertainers to perform for the guests (Chorus: Noi siamo zingarelle venute da lontano – “We are gypsy girls who have come from afar”; Di Madride noi siam mattadori – “We are matadors from Madrid”). Gastone and his friends join the matadors and sing (Gastone, chorus, dancers: È Piquillo un bel gagliardo Biscaglino mattador – “Piquillo is a bold and handsome matador from Biscay”).

Violetta arrives with Baron Douphol. They see Alfredo at the gambling table. When he sees them, Alfredo loudly proclaims that he will take Violetta home with him. Feeling annoyed, the Baron goes to the gambling table and joins him in a game. As they bet, Alfredo wins some large sums until Flora announces that supper is ready. Alfredo leaves with handfuls of money.

As everyone is leaving the room, Violetta has asked Alfredo to see her. Fearing that the Baron’s anger will lead him to challenge Alfredo to a duel, she gently asks Alfredo to leave. Alfredo misunderstands her apprehension and demands that she admit that she loves the Baron. In grief, she makes that admission and, furiously, Alfredo calls the guests to witness what he has to say (Questa donna conoscete? – “You know this woman?”). He humiliates and denounces Violetta in front of the guests and then throws his winnings at her feet in payment for her services. She faints onto the floor. The guests reprimand Alfredo: Di donne ignobile insultatore, di qua allontanati, ne desti orror! (“Ignoble insulter of women, go away from here, you fill us with horror!”).

In search of his son, Giorgio enters the hall and, knowing the real significance of the scene, denounces his son’s behavior (Giorgio, Alfredo, Violetta, chorus: Di sprezzo degno sè stesso rende chi pur nell’ira la donna offende. – “A man, who even in anger, offends a woman renders himself deserving of contempt.”).

Flora and the ladies attempt to persuade Violetta to leave the dining room, but Violetta turns to Alfredo: Alfredo, Alfredo, di questo core non puoi comprendere tutto l’amore… – “Alfredo, Alfredo, you can’t understand all the love in this heart…”.

ACT III

Violetta’s bedroom

Cover of a circa 1855 vocal score with an engraving by Leopoldo Ratti
Dr. Grenvil tells Annina that Violetta will not live long since her tuberculosis has worsened. Alone in her room, Violetta reads a letter from Alfredo’s father telling her that the Baron was only wounded in his duel with Alfredo; that he has informed Alfredo of the sacrifice she has made for him and his sister; and that he is sending his son to see her as quickly as possible to ask for her forgiveness. But Violetta senses it is too late (Violetta: Addio, del passato bei sogni ridenti – “Farewell, lovely, happy dreams of the past”).

Annina rushes in the room to tell Violetta of Alfredo’s arrival. The lovers are reunited and Alfredo suggests that they leave Paris (Alfredo, Violetta: Parigi, o cara, noi lasceremo – “We will leave Paris, O beloved”).

But it is too late: she knows her time is up (Alfredo, Violetta: Gran Dio!…morir sì giovane – “Great God!…to die so young”). Alfredo’s father enters with the doctor, regretting what he has done. After singing a duet with Alfredo, Violetta suddenly revives, exclaiming that the pain and discomfort have left her. A moment later, she dies in Alfredo’s arms.

 Header Photo: Cory Weaver

Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
Antonello Allemandi
Conductor
Kristina Mkhitaryan*
Violetta
Jacqueline Echols
Violetta (1/26)

Lyric soprano Jacqueline Echols has been praised for her “dynamic range and vocal acrobatics” (Classical Voice) in theaters across the United States. Ms. Echols’ 2018/19 season begins with her return to the Kennedy Center in the title role of Verdi’s La Traviata for a new production by Washington National Opera, directed by Francesca Zambello. Following her debut with the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra for their 2017 season opening gala concert, she returns to the orchestra for her first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in April. A frequent performer of both standard and contemporary repertoireEchols debuted the role of Helen in the world premiere performances of The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera in 2017, and reprised the role in her hometown of Detroit with Michigan Opera Theater in 2018. She has performed the role of Pip in Heggie’s Moby Dick with the Los Angeles, Dallas, and Pittsburgh Operas, as well as the role of Sister Helen in the composer’s Dead Man Walking with Washington National Opera.

Recent seasons have seen Ms. Echols with North Carolina Opera as Gilda in Rigoletto, the title role in La Traviata, and Musetta in La bohème, as well as with the Glimmerglass Festival as Pamina in Die Zauberflöte, Giulietta in King for a Day, and Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. She reprised the role of Musetta in 2017 in concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Ward Stare. A graduate of Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program, she was seen in previous seasons at the Kennedy Center as Micaëla in Carmen, the Unicorn in the world premiere of Jeanine Tesori’s The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me, Clorinda in La Cenerentola, and Woglinde and Forest Bird in Wagner’s full Ring Cycle conducted by Music Director Philippe Auguin. She made her debut with the Tanglewood Festival reprising the role of Woglinde in Das Rheingold, conducted by Andris Nelsons.

Additional appearances include Cincinnati Opera as Countess Ceprano in Rigoletto, First Lady in The Magic Flute, and Clara in Porgy and Bess; Micaela in Carmen with Eugene Opera; and New York Harlem Productions as both Clara and Bess in Porgy and Bess, for which she was featured in the documentary Porgy and Me which premiered in Germany in January 2010.

Ms. Echols is a 2012 second prize winner at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition. She completed her master’s degree and artist diploma at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she appeared as the Female Chorus in The Rape of Lucretia, the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro, Anne Truelove in The Rake’s Progress, and Pamina in The Magic Flute.

Alexey Tatarintsev
Alfredo Germont

Alexey Tatarintsev has been a resident artists at the Novaya Opera since 2008 with repertoire including lyric tenor roles from Rossini to Puccini, such as Ramiro in La CenerentolaConte AlmavivaBelfiore in Il Viaggio a ReimsNemorinoErnestoin Don PasqualeDuca in RigolettoItalian Singer in Der RosenkavalierRodolfoin Puccini’s La BohèmeRoméo in Gounod’s Roméo et JulietteLenskyYoung Gipsy in AlekoLykov in The Tsar’s BrideVladimir Igorevich in Prince Igor.

He debuted at the Bolshoi Theatre as Yasha in the world premiere of Fenelon’s opera The Cherry Orchard in 2010, a role which he repeated at the Opéra National de Paris. He is a guest soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre and the Mariinsky Theatre, performed Lensky at the Teatro Regio in Turin in 2013. Recent and upcoming engagements include Duca at the Palm Beach Opera and Malmö Opera as well as Ernesto at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Alexey Tatarintsev has toured extensively as a soloist of the Sretensky Monastery Choir in Latin America and the USA with concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Chicago Philharmonic, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress a.o. He has performed the tenor parts of Mozart’s and Verdi’s Requiem and Rossini’s Stabat Mater.

In 2016 Alexey Tatarintsev was awarded two important Russian theatre awards – “Golden Mask” for his Roméo in Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette and the “Onegin” prize for his Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. He carries the title Honoured Artist of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania and is a prizewinner of several international competitions, such as the Galina Vishnevskaya Competition.

Born in the Tambov region in Russia, Alexey Tatarintsev studied choral conducting before entering the vocal department of the Victor Popov Academy of Choral Art in Moscow where he completed his post graduate studies in 2009.

Derrek Stark+
Alfredo Germont (1/26)

Derrek Stark, tenor, is a native of Bath NY. He holds a B.M. from Mansfield University, PA, and a M.M. from The Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University, IN where he studied with Carol Vaness. In the fall of 2016, Stark joined the roster of the Benenson Young Artists at Palm Beach Opera where he covered Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly), and Duke (Rigoletto). He is enthusiastic to return to PBO as a second-year young artist where he will cover Candide and sing The Governor (Candide). A previous member of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s Young Artist Program, Stark made his company debut as the Huntsman (Rusalka) and Remendado (Carmen). As a second year young artist at Santa Fe Opera, he covered Flamand (Capriccio) and sang Harry (Fanciulla del West). Previous performance credits include: Rodolfo (La bohème); Rinuccio (Gianni Schicchi); Peter Quint (The Turn of the Screw); Tamino (Die Zauberflöte); Alfredo (La (Traviata) and Fenton (Falstaff).

Massimo Cavalletti*
Giorgio Germont
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